Episode 7. The communist acted right at the beginning or just recently? Or the story of lies, deception – the way to give the false stories.

Chapter 2. Ẩn gave the untruthful stories

Episode 7. The communist acted right at the beginning or just recently? Or the story of lies, deception – the way to give the false stories.

A. The story of lies, deception – the way to give the false stories.

I.The story of reckless!

  1. Story An married.

Reckless 1:

*Note:Bà không phải là đảng viên. Vậy tại sao Đảng lại cho phép làm đám cưới?

Tôi nói nếu họ không cho tôi cưới cô ấy thì tôi sẽ bỏ cuộc. Đó là toàn bộ câu chuyện

(Translations temporary.) “She was not a Party member. So why the Party allowed to get married?

…I say, if they do not let me marry her, I will abandon the mission. That’s the whole story.”

                Source

“…Trong suốt thời gian tiếp xúc, có nhiều vấn đề tôi đặt ra với Ẩn nhưng chưa được khám phá đầy đủ trong lần xuất bản đầu tiên. Chẳng hạn, tôi luôn thắc mắc về việc ông lấy bà Thu Nhàn vào năm 1962. Bà không phải là đảng viên. Vậy tại sao Đảng lại cho phép làm đám cưới? Sau khi đã mất nhiều thời gian để xây dựng vỏ bọc cho Ẩn, việc cho phép cuộc hôn nhân này có vẻ rất mạo hiểm. Ẩn kể với tôi rằng ban đầu người ta bảo ông không thể cưới bà, thay vào đó sẽ lấy một điệp viên khác, người có thể giúp che chở ông. “Tôi nói nếu họ không cho tôi cưới cô ấy thì tôi sẽ bỏ cuộc. Đó là toàn bộ câu chuyện”.” (Điệp viên hoàn hảo, kỳ 3: Con người thực của Phạm Xuân Ẩn là ai? – Báo tuổi trẻ, 03-10-2013)

Comment:

 “I say, if they do not let me marry her, I will abandon the mission.” Replies reckless! They will kill him immediately! An you know that?

Reckless 2:

                “On January 25, 1962, An married Hoang Thi Thu Nhan, a young woman who sold embroidery and lacquer boxes in a store on the rue Catinat. Ten years his junior, Thu Nhan was not one of his deésses,  the women who kept him out of harm’s way throughout his life, nor was she a member of the Communist Party. It was not until a month after they were married that An told his wife a few things about his secret life. Thu Nhan was not the designated agent charged with destroying An’s affairs were he to be captured. This role was reserved for two other female spies, Tam Thao and her sister, Chin Chi, who had previously declined An’s offer of marriage. Le Duc Tho, founder of the Indochina Communist Party and Pham Xuan An’s marriage counselor, played an unknown role in An’s family life, but the wedding was undoubtedly discussed by the Party at the highest levels.” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 128)

Comment:

nor was she a member of the Communist Party. It was not until a month after they were married that An told his wife a few things about his secret life.

Reckless!

Undisciplined!

They will kill him immediately! An you know that?

  1. One black mark”
  2. Le Duc Tho – “introduce An to marriageable women“.

                “After An’s induction into the Party, Le Duc Tho served tea and cakes. “He made a little speech, saying that I was still a young man and that the war would soon be over. He knew the major powers were gathering to discuss arranging an armistice in Korea, and he thought the war in Vietnam would soon be re-solved as well. He knew the Americans were replacing the French, but he had no way of knowing that the Second Indochina War would last as long as it did.”

Following Tho’s speech, he asked the cadre to introduce An to marriageable women in the Party. “They would introduce me to several girls, and I would choose among them.”

“Did he introduce you to any girls himself?”

An chuckles at the thought of Vietnam’s future prime minister functioning as a dating service. “No, he ordered his men to do it.”

“They did introduce me to girls, and I liked one of them,” An says. Before I can ask for her name, he launches into the story of another relationship.” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 62)

                Reviews:

Many will know the face “Super An”! “he asked the cadre to introduce An to marriageable women in the Party.” Oh, this will expose “Super An”!

Cheap story!

  1. One black mark”

                “When not serving him tea and cakes and introducing him to eligible girls, An’s Communist handlers could be stern. They held one black mark against him.” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 63)

                Comment: Go to America to study?

                “They held one black mark against him.” But they still believe?

Never!

III. Say evasive. (Do not know should not say)

  1. “An never said a word that evening about his job in espionage.”

 “I first met PHAM XUAN AN in July 2001 at Song Ngu seafood restaurant, located on Saigon’s bustling Suong Nguyet Anh Street. I had been invited to a dinner hosted by my friend Professor James Reckner, director of The Vietnam Center at Texas Tech University…

…An never said a word that evening about his job in espionage, focusing instead on the details of his other job as a correspondent for Reuters and Time.(Perfect Spy, Prologue, Page 1/12)                                                                                          

  1. An stopped the story and turned to page thirty of Anatomy of Spying

“…“The lucky spy is the one not yet caught” is how An always described his situation. An had several close calls, but he remembered two in particular. The first was early in his career when he had just returned from the United States and was working for Dr. Tuyen. At the time, Big Minh was a lieutenant colonel in the ARVN 3rd Division and An recommended a WAC (Women’s Army Corps) for a position in Tuyen’s office. Unbeknownst to An, she was already working secretly for the Front in Big Minh’s office, and now, on An’s recommendation, she was in Tuyen’s office. Military security asked Tuyen who recommended her for the job. When confronted, An immediately answered, “How did I know she was VC? I’m not married, she was pretty and could type, so I offered her a job. I know nothing else.” An stopped the story and turned to page thirty of Anatomy of Spying(Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 6/27)

Reviews: An say kidding? Answer “Military security” only:

“How did I know she was VC? I’m not married, she was pretty and could type, so I offered her a job. I know nothing else.”? and exit?

Never!

  1. He said in a tone indicating we should move on to the next subject.

“…An told me that when he spoke to the Viet Minh, he said he was serving as a tour guide for this young American family and they were now lost because he did not know the local roads. “I said they were a threat to no one and that Mills did not work for the government.” I somehow doubted that was all An told them and prodded him. “There are some things that even after fifty years I cannot talk about,” he said in a tone indicating we should move on to the next subject.(Perfect Spy, Chapter 2, Page 3/20)

Comment: Simply too? “Vietnamese Communist” easily persuaded?

Never!

                4.– He hid these facts from outsiders.

                “Ever since our first meeting in 1992, An had put me off the trail to discovering what he actually did during the First and Second Indochina Wars and what he continued to do as a “consultant” for Vietnam’s intelligence services until his death on September 20, 2006. He hid these facts from outsiders, with the brilliant sleight of hand and charming humor for which he was famous. When my inquiries became too pointed, he turned from assisting my book project to trying to block it. His superiors in military intelligence had given him permission to talk to me for a magazine article. He had been fond of The New Yorker from the days when he worked as assistant to Robert Shaplen, the magazine’s Far Eastern correspondent. An must have told his bosses, “It’s only a magazine article. I’ll spin the story, maybe at greater length than usual, but without giving away anything we don’t want to give away.” They had allowed him to undertake this assignment” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 5)

Reviews: “An had put me off the trail to discovering what”

                “I had first visited An in the early 1990s when I was in Vietnam researching a book on Amerasians—the children of American soldiers and their Vietnamese lovers. When the book was published, I sent him a copy, and I sent him other books when mutual friends of ours visited Vietnam. An knew that I was interested in hearing his story. He was a gracious host to the visitors who were allowed to see him after Vietnam adopted doi moi,  its version of perestroika, in the late 1980s. He would spend hours explaining Vietnamese history and culture, but he was silent as a sphinx on one subject—his life as a spy. Late in 2003, I received a message that he might finally be willing to talk, not formally but in friendly conversations. ” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 12)

                Reviews:  “He would spend hours explaining Vietnamese history and culture, but he was silent as a sphinx on one subject—his life as a spy.

                An is a great fabulist.

An is a great fabulist. He uses animal stories and proverbs to poke fun at people’s pretensions. His humor acknowledges life’s absurdities and embraces its contradictions, but sometimes I wonder if it isn’t also a shield, a kind of protective cara-pace to keep interlocutors at bay. Why did  An become a Communist? Does he joke about it because the question is too serious to be treated any other way? ” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 15)

                An always scurries.

“How does a correspondent for Reuters win a combat medal? When asked, An always scurries behind his standard explanation: he did strategic analysis and provided background information on the commanders and troops involved.” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 137)

                An was not always a reliable narrator.

An was not always a reliable narrator; he refused to talk about some parts of his life. He had a story he told about himself—about being a strategic rather than a tactical spy—which I have come to doubt. But encapsulated in his life are fundamental truths about the war in Vietnam and its after-math. I persist in thinking that the particular story of this one Vietnamese spy, who also happened to be a journalist, is our key to understanding the contemporary world of embedded reporters. “

(The Spy Who Loved Us, page 257)

  1. An always emphasized the role of luck in the spying.
  2. An always emphasized the role of luck in the spying.

Luck 1 – He assigned An to a staff position within the presidential.

“He sent a message to Dr. Tran Kim Tuyen, the man who had helped him two years earlier with his visa problems and who was still closely aligned with Diem’s brother Ngo Dinh Nhu: “I have returned from my journalism studies in the United States and need a job. Is anything available?”

…Dr. Tuyen saw much value in having the American college-educated An working for the Diem government. He assigned An to a staff position within the presidential office where he would have access to the files of the army, the National Assembly, and virtually every organization within South Vietnam. ” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 1/27)

Luck 2 – Others are dead, but An is undetected.

                “The constant danger for any agent was that a messenger would be captured with documents that would then be sent to the Combined Document Exploitation Center (CDEC), where an astute translator might trace the source. “Documents are not just secret reports; documents are the spy himself. If you lose the documents, you have also lost the spy.”11 Before October 1965, document analysis (referred to as “exploitation”) was primarily handled by the South Vietnamese military. An recalled that there was one time when a contact inside that organization showed him a captured enemy document providing a summary of his own report on counterinsurgency and ARVN strategy. “I went crazy and went to the jungle and told them to be careful how they summarized things, especially since this was something I wrote in 1961 and I knew it was mine; it was old but traceable.”.” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 5/27)

                Reviews:I knew it was mine; it was old but traceable.” Why they did not find An? An it was “Superman”! CIA blind!

Luck 3

                “An had another close call where quick thinking contained a potentially disastrous situation. After his children were asleep, and with his German shepherd and often his wife standing guard, An usually prepared his reports and film for rendezvous with Ba. One morning An overheard his daughter telling her brother that she awoke in the middle of the night and saw their father writing with a special ink and the letters disappeared. An was aghast. He had not heard her, his wife had been asleep, and the dog did not consider her an intruder, so it took no notice of her presence.

An worried that his daughter might go to school and tell her friends about this special ink. So he devised a plan to trick her. …

An always emphasized the role of luck in the spying…”  (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 7/27)

Luck 4

An was fortunate that Westmoreland had created a Hop Tac Council that would assist in the overall coordination of military and civilian agencies. Many organizations were represented, including An’s contacts in the Ministry of Interior, National Police, and the South Vietnamese Central Intelligence Organization. He was able to keep Hanoi posted on all pacification efforts, which is likely the reason Mai Chi Tho identified this as An’s greatest contribution.” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 5, Page 14/25)

Comment: If unlucky, the “super spy” death? A “super-spy” truth, will not rely on so much luck!

  1. super spy” Ba Quoc and “Luck ”!

“The role of luck is perhaps best illustrated in the case of Ba Quoc, identified in party documents as Major General Dang Tran Duc. Working for Intelligence Group H.67 under the direct guidance of COSVN, Ba Quoc operated for over twenty years inside South Vietnam, but unlike An’s, his cover was eventually compromised. “His case shows you how lucky I was and how dangerous all of our lives were during this time,” said An.

Ba Quoc was exposed purely by chance. He had already met his longtime courier, Bay Anh (who worked exclusively for Ba Quoc from 1966 to 1974), in a public market and passed on dozens of film canisters, but on this particular day, the documents were transferred from Bay Anh to a young female courier whose job was to bring them to Cu Chi. It was this courier’s bad luck that police stopped the public bus to Cu Chi looking for someone else, but decided to detain everyone to make sure there were no other Viet Cong on the bus. The police found the documents in her satchel, and within days their investigation led them to Ba Quoc, who managed to escape into the jungle before the police arrived at his home. “It was chance only. This was the kind of thing I always feared,” said An. “Maybe a courier is captured and one day I am exposed, and they come for me at Time or even worse, where there are no witnesses, and I would be tortured before being killed.”…” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 14/27)

Comment:  “The police found the documents in her satchel, and within days their investigation led them to Ba Quoc, who managed to escape into the jungle before the police arrived at his home.

Cheap story!

  1. The ridiculous story.
  2. Contact “Communist Vietnam” in any way? (how?)

“…Dr. Tuyen saw much value in having the American college-educated An working for the Diem government. He assigned An to a staff position within the presidential office where he would have access to the files of the army, the National Assembly, and virtually every organization within South Vietnam. But Tuyen soon found a more important use for his new protégé, who had asked Tuyen for an assignment in which he could make use of his journalism skills. Tuyen sent An to meet Nguyen Thai, Director General of Vietnam Press, the regime’s official press organ. Of the thousands of news items provided every day by major international news agencies, Vietnam Press selected what was politically fit for translation into Vietnamese and published it as the official viewpoint of the Diem government.

… Indeed, An’s work as a strategic intelligence agent was about to begin.”

(Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 1/27)

Comment: Contact “Communist Vietnam” in any way? (how?)

  1. An was so unsure of the situation ...

An arranged for his entire family to greet him at the airport, figuring that if he was going to get arrested, it was best to have witnesses.

… As family members milled about, An looked around for police, but no one stepped forward to make an arrest. An was so unsure of the situation that he remained at home for a month, fearing that if he ventured outside alone, he could be arrested. Spending most days looking out the window for signs of surveillance, An soon devised a simple yet carefully conceived plan to test the waters. He sent a message to Dr. Tran Kim Tuyen, the man who had helped him two years earlier with his visa problems and who was still closely aligned with Diem’s brother Ngo Dinh Nhu: “I have returned from my journalism studies in the United States and need a job. Is anything available?” By An’s calculation, if he was going to be arrested, Dr. Tuyen would never offer him a job since Tuyen was the person who kept the list of Viet Cong.”

(Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 1/27)

Comment: Never:By An’s calculation, if he was going to be arrested, Dr. Tuyen would never offer him a job…”

If An, is subject to doubt, then:An arranged for his entire family to greet him at the airport”, and: “An was so unsure of the situation that he remained at home for a month, fearing that if he ventured outside alone, he could be arrested.have effective?

An … at home for a month,”  = Dr. Tuyen – no arrests were?

  1. I went crazy and went to the jungle and told them!

“Before October 1965, document analysis (referred to as “exploitation”) was primarily handled by the South Vietnamese military. An recalled that there was one time when a contact inside that organization showed him a captured enemy document providing a summary of his own report on counterinsurgency and ARVN strategy. “I went crazy and went to the jungle and told them to be careful how they summarized things, especially since this was something I wrote in 1961 and I knew it was mine; it was old but traceable.”

(Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 5/27)

The situation was so dangerous that direct contact was not permitted

“An always referred to himself as a lone wolf agent because no one supervised his day-to-day activities. An was what is known within the U.S. intelligence community as a singleton operating within a denied area operation.12 The situation was so dangerous that direct contact was not permitted; everything would be initiated by An. He did have a series of direct supervisors, beginning with Muoi Huong.13 If there was something COSVN specifically needed, An would receive this request via coded message from Ba or she would try to catch An’s attention when he dropped his children off at school.

… In the aftermath of Richard Nixon’s historic visit to China in February 1972, an important shift occurred in An’s modus operandi. “I had to change everything after the Nixon visit because there were too many Chinese agents operating in Vietnam.”  (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 5/27)

Comment:I went crazy and went to the jungle and told them”?

Conflict: The situation was so dangerous that direct contact was not permitted

Cheap story!

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