Episode 6. The whole family knew and supported Perfect Ẩn practice “Revolution” – “Everyone in the family knew I was working for the Communists,”

Chapter 2. Ẩn gave the untruthful stories

Episode 6. The whole family knew and supported Perfect Ẩn practice “Revolution” –  “Everyone in the family knew I was working for the Communists,”  

Introductions. Typically, a spy is right secret: “prepared him for a life of loneliness”, “The spy is a lonely man. The very nature of his activities makes it impossible for him to reveal himself” and “for security reasons they were kept in the dark about his work”  as An had said.

However, An had forgotten which stated as follows: “Everyone in the family knew I was working for the Communists,”  

True that: Dummy, “cm 30 4” storytelling, so forgetful!

Let’s see:

                                                                ***

                “Everyone in the family knew I was working for the Communists,”

                ““My wife knew a little bit, but she thought I worked for the revolution. She didn’t know anything about intelligence,” An told an interviewer in 2004. According to An, everyone in his family was sympathetic to the revolutionary cause, but for security reasons they were kept in the dark about his work. His middle brother, Pham Xuan Hoa, four years younger than An, had been trained in France as a helicopter mechanic. He was flying on President Diem’s helicopter during a stormy night flight in 1962 when the craft hit the mountains north of Saigon and all thirteen people on board were killed. Diem was not on the flight. An’s youngest brother, Dinh, trained as a lawyer, got in trouble defending political prisoners and was himself imprisoned briefly. He was drafted into the army as a porter carrying munitions into battle until An used his family connections to get him reassigned to Diem’s staff. “Everyone in the family knew I was working for the Communists,” An says. “My brother Dinh wanted to join, but I said no.”

” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 129)

                Comment: “Everyone in the family knew I was working for the Communists,” An says!

He – there must be spies?

  1. Brother – “communist activities” together.

“…An wondered if any member of his family or friends had been caught up in one of these government sweeps and was now being tortured within the walls of Con Son prison. His greatest fear was that someone would give up his name as a Communist Party member. If that happened, he would never be able to return and his family could expect the worst from Diem’s police. In January 1958 An’s younger brother had been captured. “I was very sad,” recalled An. “I had lost contact with the Communists, all my leaders were captured; my younger brother was captured, and after his release he wrote me a coded message.”

…After reading his brother’s story An thought to himself, “Oh shit, he got caught. I didn’t know what to do. If I came back, then I will also get caught. But if I stay, then for how long?” An was uncertain enough about his future that he decided to study Spanish at OCC just in case there was a need to escape through South America or Cuba.…” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 3, Page 10/20)

                Pham Xuan Dinh know Muoi Huong!

““The Diem administration dragged a guillotine around the countryside, decapitating Communists, and by the end of the campaign in 1958, eighty-five percent of the Party members had been wiped out, either killed or jailed,” An says. He learned in a coded letter from his younger brother, Pham Xuan Dinh, that Muoi Huong, his case officer, had been arrested. He also learned that he was being summoned home because the Viet Minh—soon to be reborn as the Vietcong—

were finally embarking on the armed struggle that would launch the Second Indochina War.

“My brother was arrested while I was in America,” An says.

“They asked him about Muoi Huong and why he had come to visit me at my house. My brother was detained by the Saigon police until after Têt in 1958. My cousin got him out of jail—the one who worked for Ngo Dinh Can as chief of security and head of the police in central Vietnam. He came to Saigon to see the chief of police. My brother was released directly into his custody.

” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 111)

                Comment: conflict: “An says: “My brother Dinh wanted to join, but I said no.” “

But then: He learned in a coded letter from his younger brother, Pham Xuan Dinh, that Muoi Huong, his case officer, had been arrested.

True that: Dummy, “cm 30 4” storytelling, so forgetful!

  1. wife – “communist activities” together: “An told his wife that he also worked for the revolution, which touched a chord in her own heart.”

“…Thu Nhan had been working in a Saigon handicraft center close to Givral when An first saw her. “When I first met him, I thought he was intellectual, well educated, and had very good manners,” Thu Nhan told me. “He was also very social and liked to joke a lot.” After a six-month courtship, they were married on February 25, 1962. “Many, many journalist friends were at our wedding,” recalled Thu Nhan.

Six months later, An told his wife that he also worked for the revolution, Thu Nhan was prepared to do anything in support of her husband’s mission. “When I learned that my husband was carrying out secret activities for the revolution and charged with very heavy and dangerous tasks in order to gain independence for the country, I immediately accepted my husband’s cause in order to work with my husband in a way that would be most effective and safest, as we often say ‘if husband and wife are in agreement, they could dry up the East Sea.’” Thu Nhan frequently accompanied An as a lookout when he delivered documents or “stayed up almost all night with my husband to photograph documents under two 500-watt lamps when necessary, doing everything to ensure my husband not be distracted by frivolous matters or matters related to our children and family.”28

Thu Nhan told me that An had given her explicit instructions that if he was ever captured, she was not to request his release or ask for assistance because he would never betray sources and was prepared for death. “He carried a suicide pill,” Thu Nhan told me, confirming what An had told me on several occasions. “Being a woman, I was much scared and worried. I was in a constant state of being ready to deal with the worst, and had a constant feeling of ‘a fish on the cutting board.’” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 1, Page 11/19)

“One reason An refrained from joining what McCulloch calls the “beery society” of American correspondents in Saigon was the fact that he had two jobs—a day job at Time  and a night job that involved photographing documents and writing reports. After his children went to sleep, An transformed his two-room house and bathroom darkroom into a news bureau of his own. As his dogs guarded the door, he used a camera and lights bought for him by the Communist Party to work through the night photographing documents slipped to him by his friends in the Vietnamese intelligence agencies and the police.

In the morning, he disguised his film canisters to look like nem ninh hoa,  grilled pork wrapped in rice paper, or he hid them in the bellies of fish that had begun to rot. More fish and nem would be piled into baskets that looked like the offerings presented at a Buddhist funeral. When An left his house and drove to the horseracing track where he walked his German shepherd every morning, he would deposit his nem  canisters in an empty bird’s nest high in a tree. For larger shipments, he hid his rolls of film under the stele of what he pretended was a family grave.

An’s wife sometimes followed him at a distance. If he were arrested, she would alert his couriers. ” (The Spy Who Loved Us, page 170)

Comment: Story lies!

I immediately accepted my husband’s cause in order to work with my husband in a way that would be most effective and safest.” And “Thu Nhan frequently accompanied An as a lookout when he delivered documents or “stayed up almost all night with my husband to photograph documents under two 500-watt lamps when necessary…” and “An’s wife sometimes followed him at a distance. If he were arrested, she would alert his couriers. ”

An told his wife that he also worked for the revolution” thì ông ta có xin ý kiến cấp trên không?

Thật là Siêu!

  1. These children know.

                “An had another close call where quick thinking contained a potentially disastrous situation. After his children were asleep, and with his German shepherd and often his wife standing guard, An usually prepared his reports and film for rendezvous with Ba. One morning An overheard his daughter telling her brother that she awoke in the middle of the night and saw their father writing with a special ink and the letters disappeared. An was aghast. He had not heard her, his wife had been asleep, and the dog did not consider her an intruder, so it took no notice of her presence.

An worried that his daughter might go to school and tell her friends about this special ink. So he devised a plan to trick her. That evening, he awakened her with a light placed directly in front of her eyes. He then asked her to look at a page of writing done in regular ink. She, of course, could see nothing for a few minutes as her eyes adjusted, and then she could see the ink. “You see, that is what happened last night when you awoke in the middle of the night and saw me writing. You walked from the dark room into my light and only thought you saw no writing. Your eyes played a trick on you and since you were tired, you forgot all of that.” She never said another word about the special ink. An’s son An Pham later told me that he was a very light sleeper and often saw his father working late at night, but thought nothing of it…” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 7/27)

Comment: Comedy!

  1. Mothers also know! And She knew he worked for the revolution and that was enough.”!

An’s direct supervisor, Muoi Huong, was the one responsible for deciding whether An’s mission would be postponed. Recognizing that there was simply no one else prepared for this special mission, Muoi Huong assured An that the party would take care of his family. “I knew then that I would have to leave for the United States, but I also asked permission to explain the reason to my mother because this was still our mourning time,” said An. “His mother supported my husband completely, but she did not involve herself in his work,” An’s wife Thu Nhan told me. “She knew he worked for the revolution and that was enough.” With his mother’s acquiescence, An boarded a Pan Am four-prop aircraft for the flight to the United States on the evening of October 10, 1957, a few weeks after the start of classes at Orange Coast.” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 3, Page 2/20)

Comment: Never!

True that: Dummy, “cm 30 4” storytelling, so forgetful!

Look here, the An had said: “An told me that Anatomy of Spying prepared him for a life of loneliness and demonstrated the importance of self-control and mental discipline: “The spy is a lonely man. The very nature of his activities makes it impossible for him to reveal himself, for in doing so he may indirectly reveal his intentions…he shall be in complete control of himself and able to subject his instincts and reactions to strict self-discipline.”15

The book also instilled fear, a haunting sense that at any moment his mission would be over and his life snuffed out: “In war or in peace—though particularly in the former—he will be hedged about with enemies. Every man’s hand is against him; a fleeting second of self-revelation will be sufficient to launch them into the attack against him. The spy knows this…” (Perfect Spy, Chapter 4, Page 6/27)

Comment: Such that Everyone in the family knew I was working for the Communists,”?

Do not expose? it is talent!

Beg you!

Look, after his release he wrote me a coded message.”.” do not expose? CIA blind?

                                                                Bài 9. Stories … forgery!

  1. An had saved the lives Robert Sam Anson“?

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